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Monday, October 15, 2012

Stitch Details


Late this summer, I'd planned out a little wardrobe to participate in Pattern Review's wardrobe contest in October. Well, I started sewing the last few days of the month. I could probably sew a full pajama wardrobe in a week, but not a wardrobe meant for public viewing.

Now I have sewn most of the pieces and will get to wear them even if they didn't get to debut in a contest.


I liked quite a few items from the newest Ottobre Woman magazine (issue 5-2012). In fact, I think it's their best issue yet, with this summer's issue a close second.


The details on this dress appealed to me - I like the simplicity with the subtle details. Above, you can see the hand stitches at the neckline and empire waist, and the pleated sleeve trim.

I think there's an interesting juxtaposition of casual fit with formal styling here. The sleeve caps are high and narrow, but the dress itself is loose. I was able to leave off the side zipper, which is good, because I wasn't enjoying trying to put it in between the side seam pocket and the armhole.

Restricted arm movement is the drawback to the high, narrow sleeve caps, and when I raise my arms the bodice fit looks fairly awful, despite the normal fit adjustments I make for shoulders. If I made it again, I'd swap this sleeve for one with a wider, flatter sleeve cap.



Pockets!



And some replacement pants were in order for the boy, don't you think? He loved these pants with all the details - the fun back pockets and front patch pockets, as well as the darted knee segments.

Even if the knees weren't hole-y, nearly 2 inches growth since May (yahoo!) necessitated a new pair. After more than a year of growth hormone therapy, we're finally seeing results. It's not good to go 4 years without having to trace a new pattern size.







Sources:
Stitch Details Linen Dress (Ottobre Woman 5-2012-1).
Linen blend from Mill End Textiles

Frogs Pants (Ottobre 1-2008-25)
Stretch khaki denim from who knows where

18 comments:

  1. I like the style of your dress/top, would be super cute with some leggings too. The arm movement issue wouldn't be so great, as you say swap that out :O). Love the pockets!

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    1. Yeah, arm movement is so useful!

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  2. Ooh, nice dress. This one caught my eye in the magazine too, and it looks lovely on you.
    The pocket details on the boy trousers are awesome. No wonder he wanted a new pair after fully using the previous ones :)

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    1. Wanting another version of something I've made them is a high compliment, in my opinion!

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  3. As soon as I opened your blog and saw this dress, I thought "I know that dress!" I have that Ottobre and I've been looking at that dress for myself. I really like how yours turned out. I have a linen blend I was saving for another dress, but maybe I'll use it for this one. I agree, this women's issue is really packed full of beautiful things. I would really like to make the jacket (#19), but I haven't come across a nice fabric yet.

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    1. Jacket #19 is really neat with the asymmetric zipper! I think it's especially difficult to find the perfect fabric for a pattern when you've seen it made up in a specialty fabric which you're unlikely to be able to duplicate.

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    2. You know Joy, you are right about wanting to duplicate what you have seen already made up. I really, really want to make a jacket this winter but I cannot find any fabric that suits me. Farbenmix has a pattern I love, but again, I like the fabric they used and my brain refuses to see it in anything else! I even emailed them asking what the fabric is and it's not available any more.

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    3. When you do find a different fabric which ends up working really well, that's when you can pat yourself on the back for being so creative (:

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    4. Oooo, ooo, I meant to also say that Ottobre's Etsy shop sells that quilted fabric in four colors. It's pricey, about $38/yard (and narrow too I think) but it is available in four colors. So if you're absolutely set on replicated that fabulous coat, it can be done! (I'm totally wishing someone would, actually, although I'd be very jealous...)

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  4. It's cute dress/tunic. It has almost a retro 60s feel to it. Nice pants too!

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    1. I think you're right - the shape does have a 60s feel to it.

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  5. I've got this dress (in a tunic length though) next on my list to trace out, I really love this issue of Ottobre too. I love the little hand-stitching, I was disappointed you couldn't see it more in the magazine so I appreciate being able to see yours! Also, thanks for the heads-up on the sleeves, I'm guessing I'll go straight to another sleeve right away, I have large upper arms and close-fitted sleeve caps are a nightmare for fit.

    Also, you are the Pocket Queen!

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    1. I should have known better as soon as I saw the sleeve cap in the pattern. I made one other garment of theirs (a coat) which was unwearable for that reason. This one's not as bad as that, but still frustrating.

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  6. You've some lovely detailing on your dress and I can see how the contrasting details and styling made you want to make this dress.

    And it's great that your son has grown, as well as worn his trousers so well. I agree that you are the Pocket Queen.

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    1. Thanks! I don't always go to the effort of adding little stitch details (or other details), but rarely regret it when I do.

      And yes, we're very pleased he's growing (:

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  7. I love the hand stitches. It´s funny you mention you find high armholes restrict your movement...I always make the same remark about low armholes I find in US patterns...and I always take them up. But I am yet to perfect my sleeve issues...

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    1. No, I think you're right about the lower armhole restricting arm movement.

      By sleeve cap I mean the curvy top part of the sleeve which attaches to the armscye. A high, skinny sleeve cap is what you see in formal clothes (like a fitted jacket). The lines are neat and clean, but mainly when you hold your arms straight down! A shallower, wider sleeve cap gives you more ease and therefore mobility, but the greater amount of fabric in the upper arm of the sleeve tends to fold around the underarm (as in a t-shirt), which doesn't look so formal!

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  8. I did not realize that about sleeve cap shape, very useful to know! I like the dress, the trim on the sleeves is so adorable. Very glad to hear the growth hormone therapy is working. You can't say he doesn't appreciate your sewing based on how lovingly those pants were worn!

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