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Monday, February 24, 2014

A Sweatshirt with Easy Welt Pockets (Really?)


The more I sew clothes for my cohorts, the more specific their requests. Alex wanted a zippered, hooded sweatshirt with pockets attached so they didn't flop around, and NO drawstring. Well, yay, this pattern fit the bill.

The sweatshirt is Ottobre 3-2005-29. I bought this old magazine issue because it actually has a few men's garments. This particular pattern comes in both children's and men's sizes.


Alex also likes the higher, but not tight, neckline since it's warm and cozy. The hood is lined with black jersey.

I added some extra orange reverse-coverstitch topstitching which coordinated somewhat with my rust zipper. My stash is happy to have rid itself of this ridiculous two-way zipper. It was so long, I had to cut about 2 feet off. No, sewing a rust-colored sleeping bag is not in my future.



Now, did I really say sewing welt pockets (in polar fleece, no less) was easy? Precision sewing in fluff when you can't see your needle wasn't the easy part, but this clever pocket design made the welt easy:


See those vertical dotted lines on the pattern piece? Those are pleat (or fold) lines.



Here is the procedure in steps:
1. (not shown) After marking the rectangle, place the pocket piece right sides together with the garment. Stitch the rectangle. Slash and clip to the corners. Turn to the inside and press unless you have polyester fleece. [Normal welt procedure.]



Reverse side.



2. Pleat or fold the pocket piece over so it just covers the rectangular opening.



I haven't done any topstitching here yet, but that sure formed a great welt!


And lastly, since I didn't want to risk melting my fabric, I "interfaced" my zipper facing with some strips of woven fabric. I serged the long raw edge and serged the other edge to the wrong side of the fabric.

14 comments:

  1. It's like children haute couture round your way! That's a great sweat and a brilliant pocket tip. It really is neat!

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    1. Thanks! I was so pleased to discover this new welt pocket method.

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  2. Thanks for sharing. The sweatshirt looks great. Very cool pocket.

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  3. You can never have too many zip up sweatshirts! I'm sure I will be referring to your tutorial on this welt pocket one day. :)

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    1. I agree, Shirley! I'm thinking about making myself one of these.

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  4. I love all the kid sewing you've done recently. The only downside? All the patterns I have to earmark in my Ottobres. And how wonderful that your kids grow up with custom-made clothes. You'll have to teach them all how to sew, no way they'll be able to buy RTW!

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    1. Now, that is a downside (: Thanks, Uta!

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  5. The hoodie looks great! Thank you for sharing pictures of the welt pocket construction. The one time I did a welt pocket with an OD pattern I completely stuffed it up. Seeing the pictures completely cleared up my confusion.;)

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    1. My first welt pocket with Otto was by no means stellar, but this construction was really simple. This issue is from 2005, but I think they should keep using the clever welt pocket technique in their new issues.

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  6. That is a very cool welt pocket piece. I agree that it is hard to see your lines with all that fluffy fabric.
    Love the orange stitching on this and the hoodie looks so nice and warm - I also think the higher neckline is cool

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    1. Thanks, Kristin! It's hard to see the lines when you're sewing fleece, but somehow you can always see the wonky stitching lines afterwards ):

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  7. Your fleece welt pocket is a masterpiece. Mine usually require lots of "decorative" topstitching to disguise wonkiness. I will be using these nice instructions next time!

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    1. Thanks, Karen. I will say I chose the better of the two pockets for the photo (:

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